HOME | PASSPORT | DAY TO DAY SYLLABUS | ELECTRIC ARTKIVE | CYBORG DIARY| ANDROIDS CLOSET

SPRING 2011 | ENGLISH 220 (SECTIONS 3 THRU 10) MAIN LECTURE, MONDAY AND WEDNESDAY @ 11AM 

PETERSON GYM (PG) 153 {WITH BREAKOUT SECTIONS ON MONDAYS AND WEDNESDAYS, AS WELL} | SDSU



Dr. William A. Nericcio with Ryan Forsythe, Tara Whitehead, 

Rebecca Howat, & Zachary Cavanaugh, AssociatedAndroids, INC.

 

ur utterly experimental and improvisational Spring 2011 sections  (Engl 220.3—Engl 220.10) of  "Introduction to Literature" will be a veritable wonderland filled with bizarre, alluring fictional bodies.  From the remarkable and haunting paintings of Rene Magritte to the irreverent and hilarious musings of Kurt Vonnegut, from the dark, sensual Long Beach in the prose of Myriam Gurba, to the (slightly demented) exotic borderlands in the writings of yours truly, our catalogue of textual and screened delights has enough controversy, outrage, and mystery to keep us busy for a lifetime. But as we have only 15 weeks to introduce ourselves to the range of artifacts that pass as literature at the dawn of the 21st Century, things will zip along at an amphetamine-laced pace!

 

Make no mistake about it: this is NOT a survey of long, white-haired, sedate, upper-crust, high literature--we will be as obsessed with film, photography, and the internet, as we will the trappings of traditional literature.  More an introduction to Cultural Studies than a long-in-the-tooth worship festival of the old classics (sorry Shakespeare, get-out th'way Milton, adios Edmund Spenser), our multi-media exercise in fictional fetishism will try to set itself apart with vivacious books, paintings, and film filled with tortured, naked, broken imaginations.

 

We will be eccentric—ex-centric, outside the circle—as we explore the world of alternative subjectivities, "televisual" constructions (think Facebook) where individuals make and remake themselves on a daily basis.  The robotic electric will drive our curious thirst as we try to understand why our species creates versions of itself that it then re-markets (to itself) in various media: books, film, photography, the web, etc.  It turns out that the seductive fantasies, grotesque nightmares, and alluring hallucinations that our creative writers, directors, photographers, artists, philosophers make—shamans of fiction, all—form a key part of what we call our psyche: the psychology or soul that passes for the person you tell people you are.

Various folks will help us on our way: Franz Kafka, that dark closeted hallucinator whose bizarre imagination rewrites the course of 20th century literature; Dan Clowes, the graphic artist and novelist, whose Ghost World reveals the nightmare world of Americanicus Suburbia with cunning insight and vicious wit;  there are others, with the final lineup still in flux.


One last thing! I promise this class will do more for knowledge of reading, writing, and literature than this one!

 

An invitation

Though this is an English 220 class, upper-division folks and graduate students who are crazy about literature, film, and visual culture can take the class as a Engl 499 Special Study course or an English or MALAS (Master of Arts in Liberal Arts and Sciences) 798 Special Study—do please check with your department advisor before pursuing this track.  Email me at bnericci@mail.sdsu.edu for more info!


REQUIRED BOOKS








Robotic, Erotic, Electric: Televisual Nightmares, Seductive Hallucinations
and Naked Psyches in Literature, Film, Art and the Web | memogr@phics designcasa
Dr. William A. Nericcio, Spring 2011 @ SDSU